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to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
nixon declared, he wanted to criminalize but also treat a lot of addicts. we have gone away from the treatment model all together. why did we lose sight of that being part of the whole model? >> easy politics to say you are tough on crime. nixon discovered that in '68 he made crime a national issue. the funny thing about nixon, he deserves credit on the ground how he dealt with adikts. he dealt with a drug problem in a way where two-thirds of his drug budget were spent on treatment, only a third on interdiction and law enforcement. he knew personally and practically from experience that treatment was the way to go yet he also knew on the campaign trail that doesn't sell. i will protect from you the evil ers do down the block, i will protect you from this scourge in american life that got him like theed in a landslide in '72, now politics have followed suit ever since, reagan, clinton, both parties agree on one thing, saying you are not tough on crime has been political suicide. i believe it is changing but it has been till now political suicide. >> well, you were just telling us
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
count above all. jfk, tan. nixon, just out of the hospital, pale, refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get those rosy cheeks. lesson four, real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and takes it from the old gipper. it works. i think there's so much choreography that goes behind the debates. iasciwhat made-for-tv evehey first started with nixon and kennedy. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- getting ready for the duel in denver. >> we'll see how both candidates are preparing for the first presidential debate coming up tomorrow night. it is tuesday, october 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good to
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
for him. which lead to lesson three. appearances count above all. jfk, tan. nixon just out of the hospital, pale. refusing proquestional make -- refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wean just before going on to get rosie cheeks. lesson four, real debate sowing -- lesson four, real debating, so far after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and rosie. takes it from the old gipper. >> nice, glass of wine, relaxes you, gives you the blush. it works. i think there is so much choreography that goes behind the debates. it really is fascinating what a made-for-tv event they have become since 1960 when they first started nixon/kennedy. >> i imagine you would be a great debater. >> go ahead and say it. >> no. >> a joke you, know you want
that ted rogers put there for nixon and he said, don't let anybody change this. i said, get out of the way or i'm going to call the police. he immediately left and i changed the air conditioning back to normal. wilson understand the game and how it was going to be played. the candidates had their jobs to do, so did their handlers. he said his opponent, he said, he wanted to keep his job because of the screw-up that happened in the first debate. this is what goes on in politics. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. >>> tomorrow i'll be in denver. we'll have live editions of "hardball" at 5:00 and 7:00 eastern. and complete coverage of the debate with my msnbc colleagues at 8:00. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show." 25 hours before the first presidential debate and 35 days until the 2012 election. mitt romney and paul ryan are scrambling. robert gibbs is here tonight to respond. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >>> you can use your charitable deduction or home mortgage deduction and can fill a that bucket,
president richard nixon had recently gotten over a bout with an infection that left him looking shaky. kennedy looked healthy and strong. when kennedy won nearly half said the debate played a role in the decision. al gore was criticized for sighing and rolling his eyes while debating george bush in 2000. and then capped it off with this moment. >> it is not what your philosophy and position on issues but can you get things done. and i believe i can. >> that's funny. i'm sorry. you hear this next one repeated many times. it came from ronald reagan during his debate with jimmy carter. reagan posed a simple question. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> four years later president reagan was 73 facing concerns about his age, an issue compounded by his shaky first debate and then turned the weakness into a strength with this line. >> i want you to know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> bill clinton was on the other side of that equation while debating another 7
of the heroism of the bystanders in portland, maine. urs la nixon broke her leg after she crashed her car into the harbor. several people you see in the pictures there they jumped into the water as the car slowly sank below the surface. nix nixon's family says she faces weeks of recovery but she's grateful to her rescuers. looked like about five people or so there, wolf, jumped in that water. i'm sure that water wasn't very warm either talking portland, maine. >> they saved her. good for them, good for her. >>> gloria borger sat down with ann romney. but first, our unsolicited advice panel is standing by. they're going to preview some key questions you're going to want to listen for in tonight's debate. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin
, it happened. kennedy, nixon. >> i got $5. >> the rest of us got a tradition. an evolving tradition praised and criticized over the last 52 years. >> what about you? do you think debates are good now or bad? >> i don't know. mr. cann is a good reminder, often the americans who make democracy better are the americans who don't take democracy for granted. gary, 9news. >> i give the debates two thumbs up. i think it's important to know what our candidates think and put them on the spot here. now tonight, i am here at u.s.a. today's newsroom where our live coverage gins tonight at 9:00. you can catch the debate on our website. of course you can join us for a wrap up of the debate tonight at 11:00. and topper shutt has the story on what the weather is looking like out there. top. >> first of all, talk about fall colors. we're looking at near peek as you go on the other side of the divide past cumberland, over toward oakland. some good color showing toward i-81. wait a couple of weeks. some color, but south and east, no color at all. all right, next three days, code green, getting better an b
was the case. john kennedy against nixon was the case. you can argue in 2000 with bush and gore. some of these debates turn more on style than substance. the economy is front and center tonight. that is an area mitt romney feels he's got the ammunition. he's got the data. the concern among some of the romney supporters is he doesn't walk out on the data. he's got it down cold. the criticism is he hasn't brought passion to the argument and he's the guy to lead the change. expect him to throttle on the weakness of this recovery. expect the president to come back and show with the latest jobs figures and others that has been moving in the right direction, that the trend is his friend. they're each going to look at the same thing, selling it differently. >> are there some concerns in the president's camp, similar concerns to those in the romney camp? because the president, though he brings passion, he can be wonky and goes on with the answers. >> reporter: who am i to judge people on being dull? there is a concern that boeing of these guys -- the president is a gifted, eloquent speaker. t
debates. john kennedy and richard nixon how nixon loft because he didn't wear make up and looked like he didn't shave. they thought he was dark and smarmy. turns out they were right, he was. >> whether was the al gore sigh, over and over again. [ sighs ] >> exactly. before that debate, al gore was five points ahead of george burke, after the sigh, he stalled out and george bush still lost that election, but he closed in close enough for the supreme court to make the call at home plate. but, my favorite, the absolute best debate moment of all lloyd benson, 1988 versus dan quayle. >> i have as much experience in the congress as jack kennedy did when he got the presidency. >> senator i served with jack kennedy. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. [ cheers and applause ] >> that was really uncalled for senator. >> you're the one that was making the comparison, senator. >> oh, smack! >> i love that! >> and there's one more. let's keep them on a high note. there's one more not from a general election debate but from a primary just last year
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
was assigned to conduct the first mission to china. largely because president nixon felt that if he went through regular channels, he would be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not up to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i cannot overwhelm him with details. so when i first came to china, i had an experience which is perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met mao. i knew my life would not be worth living if i came back having done the first photograph of an american with chairman mao. chairman mao had given instructions that if i requested a meeting with him, i should be taken to him immediately. i went through enormous contortions not to request a meeting. [laughter] and so i achieved that goal of my visit. i've met, of course, each generation of chinese leaders. reflected theaem mission and the conditions of his period. mao was a revolutionary,
. president eisenhower didn't do that, president nixon didn't do that, president reagan made us feel like we were all in it together. >> i've never seen a politician say, i'll take the other part of the vote. i'm not interested in your half, or in this case, 70% he's giving away. >> that's right. i have never heard such language. i think it will allow obama to extend the 47% argument to not only ryan but to the entire republican party. he can say, this is a party that slices and dices the american public. in some ways i think this argument about 30% of the people being lazy, 47% of the people being lazy, goes against the idea of american exceptionalism. how can america be that exceptional if 50% of the country is lazy? we know that's not true. america is an exceptional country. you'll see both romney and ryan struggle with this and have something to answer to tonight on stage and then when ryan takes the stage ultimately next week. but i do think ryan and biden do have something that neither of the principles have. that is, they speak from their gut. they speak from their hearts. and i think
and lost all the way going back to nixon and kennedy. often, it was a really good one liner that summedded up someone or it was a good rebuttal, and often, it was a gaffe. neil: do you think they change the outcome, though? i mean, if you look back at 1980, you could argue the momentum was beginning to go in ronald reagan's favor. you can argue in 1960, though the race was tight, people were open to a challenger. you're smarter than i'll ever be, pat, but does it change the outcome or confirm a trend? >> i think the 1980 debate did not change the outcome, but i think it -- reagan won. he was moving ahead. i think that's why carter wanted to debate, but that gave him a 10-point victory. i think that the
. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise statement >> we believe peace is at hand. >> the first so-called october surprise, late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election in spite of president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, delayed freeing the hostages. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> reporter: fast forward to 1992. president george h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy. when casper weinberger was implicated in the iran-con
in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between nixon and mcgovern. on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kiss jer made a surprise declaration. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> it was the fird so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win reelection for nixon 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election. despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated. setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with ryan to delay freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> fast forward to 1992, president jhw bush was on the ropes a
. >> a history of modern presidential debates. the first one was in 1960, kennedy-nixon. then there was a hiatus until 1976, when gerald ford agreed to debate jimmy carter. the debate commission was established in 1987. jim lehrer, tonight's moderator, has moderated the most debates over those years, 12 altogether. you have gotten criticisms about a moderator 6 -- selection, that they are mainstream media, all white, and middle-age or older. what is the response to that? >> we would state it slightly differently. we would say we have picked four exceptional journalists to have a lot of experience in doing presidential debates and covering politics in the white house and in foreign policy. we think they are also four individuals who have proven it is not about them. we do not want moderator's here trying to put themselves ahead of what the candidates have to say. at the end of the day, the american people want to hear from the candidates. one thing jim lehrer has demonstrated is that he is the type of moderator who lets the candidates do the talking. he will ask the questions, they will be pointe
of nixon's supporters in 1960 were so impressed with this young jack kennedy that they said he didn't sweat. seems pretty cool. seems ok and lot of people had problems with george bush but against john kerry they thought he seems arrogant and frankenstein, i will go to george bush. they can change your established based too and if the other guy does such a great job it could also galvanize his base at the expense of the other guy's base. all stuff we don't know and won't know until election. [talking over each other] neil: bring weapons and kevin thought i should keep that to myself. or something. another ball and chain kind of thing. the next that idea. [talking over each other] dagen: i won't even let you do that. connell: stay here all day if you one. tomorrow night -- dagen: put you to sleep. connell: i am used to it. goes in one year. [talking over each other] connell: special coverage starts at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night. [talking over each other] connell: department of defense telling lockheed martin not to be concerned about the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. rich edson at th
they helped john kennedy overtake richard nixon. 1980 helped reagan over take carter. 2000 helped bush overtake gore. romney was behind in 02 race for governor in massachusetts, he was trailing badly six weeks before the election. the campaign reorganized, romney pulled his advisors together. they decided on a new strategy which was to get tough and get specific and romney went on to win that 2002 race for governor in massachusetts. so we will see if he can repeat history here with these debates starting tonight. dagen and connell? connell: peter barnes reporting from denver for us. let's go to ron paul now, republican congressman from texas and former presidential candidate himself. he's calling in today on the telephone from texas. congressman paul, always good to talk to you. if a paul supporter is watching the debate tonight and needs to be convinced by romney, what does romney have to do, do you think? >> make sure he sounds a little bit different than the other and be convincing that his policies are a lot different. many people that joined the freedom movement were frustrated, y
it was a game changer when president kennedy debated richard nixon. same was true with ronald reagan when he debated jimmy carter. it can make a difference. mitt romney needs to come out and be very aggressive about the president's policies and his solutions. and i think he will do real good. >> we know they've been rehearsing zingers or we're told by a "new york times" report this morning that mitt romney has been practicing zingers. i guess practicing them on some of his aides as well. you just talked about substance. others have been focusing on, well, really it's the moments and the zingers that make the difference. which do you think it is? >> there has to be a sense throughout -- at the end of the debate, the viewer will have a sense as to who can be the better leader for the united states. and mitt romney has to come across as, well, he can do a better job leading the united states on domestic policies. so it's an impression that the viewer will get overall. it will be the zingers. but it will be really the impression. who can create the better impression of leadership and that person
am. >> presidential diet dibaits have actually determined how nixon and gore came off as likable or not. >> 2008 i host a show on cnn called what they didn't talk about. that's also going to be key. i hope you really do have some expansive issues beyond the same kind of stuff we always have been hearing. i'll be paying attention to the next day is what they didn't focus on. >> "american idol" america now? back in those days it wasn't an "american idol" mencht it took less to entertain people. do you think voters want to be entertained and wooed? >> some voters are undecided and people want to hear specifics from the candidates. by this time most americans have made up their mind. and that's why they don't matter as much as they used to. people are coming to the debates with with their partisan jerseys on, rooting for their guy. big diences, but not a lot of people in recent elections are making up their mind based on them. >> let me disagree this one time with ryan lizza. the reagan can/ca/carter debate week before. >> this is 2012. because of early voting, saturation of televisi
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